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grammarlyblog:

In matters of love, put your best foot forward — proofread!
Download Grammarly Lite to write without mistakes on Tumblr, Gmail, Twitter, Facebook and more. It’s FREE. http://bit.ly/XSjvbA

Truth

grammarlyblog:

In matters of love, put your best foot forward — proofread!

Download Grammarly Lite to write without mistakes on Tumblr, Gmail, Twitter, Facebook and more. It’s FREE. http://bit.ly/XSjvbA

Truth

(Source: grammarlyblog)

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Yup.

Yup.

(Source: grammarlyblog)

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My life

My life

(Source: grammarlyblog)

Tags: grammar
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grammarlyblog:

The idea that you should never, ever end a sentence with a preposition is a myth.  Winston Churchill pointed out how silly it sounds to break up a phrasal verb in order to avoid placing the preposition at the end of the sentence.
In general, remove the preposition if it is unnecessary (“Where are you at?” —> “Where are you?”). If the preposition is part of a phrasal verb, it is fine to end the sentence with the preposition.  Keep in mind, however, that for academic and some business writing, people may expect you to keep prepositions away from the end of the sentence. If you are writing for school or business, check with a teacher or supervisor OR rephrase your sentence in order to avoid using the preposition at the end of the sentence.
Grammar Girl has a great article on this myth.

This is something I agree with.

grammarlyblog:

The idea that you should never, ever end a sentence with a preposition is a myth.  Winston Churchill pointed out how silly it sounds to break up a phrasal verb in order to avoid placing the preposition at the end of the sentence.

In general, remove the preposition if it is unnecessary (“Where are you at?” —> “Where are you?”). If the preposition is part of a phrasal verb, it is fine to end the sentence with the preposition.  Keep in mind, however, that for academic and some business writing, people may expect you to keep prepositions away from the end of the sentence. If you are writing for school or business, check with a teacher or supervisor OR rephrase your sentence in order to avoid using the preposition at the end of the sentence.

Grammar Girl has a great article on this myth.

This is something I agree with.

(Source: grammarlyblog)

Tags: grammar funny
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buzzfeed:

Happy National Punctuation Day everybody!

This is so me.

buzzfeed:

Happy National Punctuation Day everybody!

This is so me.

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grammarlyblog:

We’ll give Pink Floyd a pass for artistic license, but don’t you be using no double negatives, now!

grammarlyblog:

We’ll give Pink Floyd a pass for artistic license, but don’t you be using no double negatives, now!

(Source: grammarlyblog)

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grammarlyblog:

Yes.

How relevant.

grammarlyblog:

Yes.

How relevant.

(Source: grammarlyblog)

Tags: grammar
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theyuniversity:

“RESPECT PUNCTUATION” posters.
To see the entire set of punctuation posters, visit tinyowlstudios.

Clearly.

theyuniversity:

“RESPECT PUNCTUATION” posters.

To see the entire set of punctuation posters, visit tinyowlstudios.

Clearly.

(Source: theyuniversity, via grammarlyblog)

Tags: grammar
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grammarlyblog:

Remember: “I” is a subject and “me” is an object. 
Incorrect:
Joe gave the flowers to Sue and I.
Joe gave the flowers to I.
Correct:
Joe gave the flowers to Sue and me.
Joe gave the flowers to me.
Joe me the flowers.

Yup.

grammarlyblog:

Remember: “I” is a subject and “me” is an object. 

Incorrect:

  • Joe gave the flowers to Sue and I.
  • Joe gave the flowers to I.

Correct:

  • Joe gave the flowers to Sue and me.
  • Joe gave the flowers to me.
  • Joe me the flowers.

Yup.

(Source: grammarlyblog)

Tags: grammar
Text

Obama has a new campaign slogan,”Forward.” Is the period correct or incorrect?

grammarlyblog:

Cast your vote at our Facebook page.

No!

(Source: grammarlyblog)

Tags: grammar